Skip to main content

About your Search

20121031
20121031
STATION
CNBC 6
CNNW 6
FBC 6
CNN 5
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
WTTG 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KSTS (Telemundo) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 75
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
, comparing her to hurricane irene..."hey sandy, irene left hurriiane storm, comparing irenee.."hey sandd, irene left her panties here,,come try them on." but rporters werrn't so full of bravadd...when the wiid left a crane dangling over manhattaa... (nats) i don't mean toossund chicken but as soon s we saw and wee &psaw it danglinggwe started runnnng from 57th. hhrricanes and higg risss don't mmx. (nats) uh oh we just had lass breaking out heee, we just had glass breaking. for some it (nats))oo even dress up like a shirtlesssman jogging wearing a horreemask the hurricann horse later tweeted out a picture of himself. butt reporters don'tt lways appreciatt prannsters behiid their baaks... nats) big guy there ou can go talk to people ater who llse theii homes. ffom a fake horse to a real deer. wwbc reports this one was rescuee afttr imagine getting that deer in the headlights look from a deer in tte surf. jeannn moos, cnn new york. coming up... will the weather be gooo enough for trick-or-treating? yourrhalloween forecast... next.youure watching fox 45 good ddy baltimorr. adding up th
saw this last year in new york state, for example, when we got the one-two punch of hurricane irene and then the tropical storm lee. so there was quite an uptick in that sort of business. >> ted, thanks. we may catch up again to see how things have hopefully changed. >>> stick around. after the break, we'll find out how the storm could impact the election. the president is getting set to tour new jersey. stay with us for that. >>> we'll leave you with a look at how the futures are trading. the markets are reopening today on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." >> here are the headlines today. >> super storm sandy leaves a massive path of devastation in its wake, and residents up and down the u.s. east coast are now starting what could be a long and costly recovery process. >> but it is back to business for the financial markets in the u.s., they're going to reopen after a few days. it may not be so easy as new york's mass transit system is still snarled. >>> plus, the force. disney has agreed to buy lucas films for $4 billion and promises a brand-new "star wars" fi
, for irene they were 7, but irene was closer to 20, i think they will be as bad. but now, look at all storethat are closed, flights that have not gone out, hotels and businesses onshore and new york city that are down for 4 days, that is a loss of income. that is 20 billion that gets me to 40. gerri: wow, okay that makes sense. people underestimate the costs. i read new york city alone is an economy with $4 billion that pumps out $ 4 billion eve day, times 5 is $20 billion, not just damage you repair. it is also the loss of productivity, workdays, loss payroll, it could be far more devastating than we've been talking babout, you also said, in short term painful but longer term we get a bunch of federal dollars that will pump energy into the economy. >> absolutely, if we have $20 billion in property damage we spend more than that rebuilding, we always do, on the shore property so valuable, they will build bigger homes and businesses. obsolete capital will be replaced by modern capital. we'd get multiplier effect, you spend a dollar on infrastructure, you get a dollar in gdp from additi
perdió todo, refrigeradores, comida, no tenemos nada. >>> ni irene el año pasado, ni una gota de agua entró. >>> lamento no haber salido temprano pero no se pudo. >>> no se pudo, cómo quedó la casa. >>> debajo de 4 pies de agua. >>>e ste sector de nueva jersey es una de las más afectadas, nos han contado sus historias de cómo el nivel del agua fue subiendo, pero también dice que con la colaboración de todos pudieron salir adelante de esta prueba . >>> una de 4 habitantes es hispano. >>> nos despertamos a las 11 de la noche y mi vecina nos dijo, nos inundamos y en 5 minutos esto creció impresionante. >>> aquí estamos. >>> entre los vecinos se ayudaron. >>s>sí, sí y así estamos ayudándonos. >>> durante todo el día los organismos de socorro realizaron búsquedas. >>> solo queda trabajar, es lo que queda ante esto. >>>s andy escogió un sector muy cercano a atlantic city para entrar a la costa este, nayeli chávez geller la recorrió para saber cómo está después del paso de sandy >>> la poderosa sandy no se apiadó de nueva jersey donde la furia de las olas atacaron esta
the candidates are neck-and-neck. >> hold on tight. irene takes me on a fast pace tour of the retirement community in her golf cart. florida is home to many retirees, and a high proportion of them vote. i asked her if they are aware of their influence. >> well, you know, we have people in here 94, 93, 99. some of them are still pretty sharp, and then you have others who are not near that age that do not know what day of the week it is. >> most residents in the community have healthy finances and can afford to pay their rent and purchase a home here. that makes them more likely to lean republican. that is the case with irene, who has supported the republicans for over 60 years. but now, she fears that mitt romney may cut her social security and medicare benefits or privatize them. >> i have never been torn like this in any election, and that's the god's truth. i could have lied to you and said i will vote for romney, but i do not know if i am, and i am a republican. >> state pensions and health care are among the biggest contributors to u.s. deficits. americans agree that government spend
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
. >> damages are likely to surpass those of last year's hurricane irene. sandy has move left much flooding in its wake, paralyzing new york's mass transit system and leaving millions in the dark -- sandy has left much flooding in its wake. >> here is more from america's most populous city. >> the storm has moved on, but the water remains. many of the city's road and subway tunnels are still flooded. public transport will be out of action for days to come. the effects of sandy can be seen on the streets -- residents are relieved that the worst is now behind them. >> well, last night, we could look down this street here, and we saw the river coming toward us. it actually look like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> near central park, a crane dangles from a construction site over the street below. the storm caused it to partially collapsed. there are still strong winds, but nothing like those of monday night, which saw gusts of up to 130 kilometers per hour. there were record levels of flood water. emergency services are working around the clock. firefighters were called to a l
, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-related shutdown since 1888. but the major exchanges are expected to reopen tomorrow. all systems are a go. the new york stock exchange said the opening bell will ring as usual at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. the nasdaq will also open for normal operations on wednesday. that's just what investors wanted to hear. both exchanges have been running tests today to make sure all systems were running smoothly. >> susie: the nyse's building is located on wall street, just blocks away from the section of lower manhattan that was deluged by hurricane sandy. but there was no flooding at the big board, and no other damage to the building, trading floor and trading systems. but while the nyse and nasdaq expect tomorrow to be business as usual, it won't be a typical day for people trying to get to work. many of new york's bridges and tunnels are still clos
los afectados por el paso del huracan irene en ese mismo territorio en 2011. muchas casas fueron arrancadas de sus cimientos, carros terminaron volcados y hasta un juego mecanico fue arrastrado por el agua.. mayra tostado. noticiero telemundo 48. cesar ---ambos candidatos a la presidencia han tenido que suspender sus campaÑas proselitistas por sandy... take vo ---pero hoy el presidente barack obama, hablo con su equipo de seguridad nacional y pidio a todas las agencias federales que hagan todo lo posible para ayudar a los damnificados por la tormenta... ---el mandatario anuncio que continuara en la capital de la nacion, para cerciorarse personalment e que todos los recursos federales sean proporcionados a las labores de rescate emprendidas por gobiernos estatales y locales... blanca ---las consecuencia s del huracan sandy continuan afectando a los viajeros en el aeropuerto internacional de san francisco... take vo ---por tercer dia las autoridades decidieron cancelar al menos 114 vuelos afectando 50 vuelos de salida y 64 de llegada... ---este aeropuerto es uno de los mas efectad
of gasoline as opposed to the producer, and some other hurricanes like katrina and irene before, they've hit an area that has been a big producer of oil, whereas really, in the northeast, they are the consumers of all of that gasoline, and so demand has dropped, but the supply hasn't really dropped as much. > > so the demand is dropping, especially as people are stuck home and not going to offices for instance. > > right. flights are canceled, and people are not driving around as you said, so the demand there has dropped, and that, interestingly enough, has pushed some prices in the southeast region down even further because that oil that usually would have gone to the northeast has dropped off a little bit. > > so much of this boils down to what's going on with the refineries. so what do you anticipate there? you know, we think that this is going to be just a temporary shutdown in the northeast region, and that, as i said earlier, we are going to continue to see prices continue to drop, and demand will come back up after the hurricane is through. > > quick predictions now: where do you see
gone. >> i've never seen anything like it before. irene, nothing even close. i went to the beach yesterday and it was like a tornado walked through. i walk it every day. i have never seen anything like it. >> i've never seen anything like it. we've been through storms and blizzards and this one they said it was going to be bad and its with. >> reporter: belmar emergency responders were pulling people from their homes. >> they have been staging ambulances over here and they get boats and kayak out or motor out and pick up whoever needs help. >> the governor is urging patience. >> i think this town is resilient and been through some stuff, so we know to sit and follow direction. >> derek, we will have more at 11:00. the boardwalk was also destroyed. a lot of flooding and property damage there. right now we are in ocean view, new jersey. but like all of the other small towns, and new jersey is nothing but a bunch of small towns along with newark and atlantic city, a lot of damage here. look behind me at ocean view. some of those people with no power. the lights you see are our light
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
than lost power during hurricane irene. this is a monumental, monumental task that we have in front of us. i would ask them this week for their patience and then the week after that, we will need their resilience as we begin to go back to work and rebuild our state. but we're going to continue to work, we're doing search and rescue missions now, still. we have been doing them all day. we have been saving hundreds of people from places across new jersey and law enforcement is committed to continuing to do that until nightfall again tonight, then we'll start again tomorrow morning. >> you have a young family, are they all okay? where were they when this was going down? and what do you say to your children, what does any parent say to a child when this kind of catastrophe happens on their doorstep? >> well, first off, you give them a hug and say don't be scared, mom and dad will protect you. that's the first thing you do. second, my family was at our family home in mendham when we lost power finally late yesterday afternoon. the state police moved them down to the governor's residence
they will be able to recoup it. we have seen it happen after the hurricane irene. the question is what kind of a backlash utilities will face to their storm restoration efforts. they're trying their best but it will take many days before the power service is restored. and that usually triggers a lot of regulatory scrutiny and that is not good news for utilities. >> as you look at the president's helicopter fleet there touring atlantic city, are any single companies of those you follow here more at risk to really devastating hits on their balance sheets or not? can you handicap it in any way for us? >> well, ouriously obviously ns the hardest hit area. 50% of households currently in new jersey are without power. coastal communities in new jersey and on long island should have the highest impact. so percentage, jcp and l, lipa on long island will have the highest impacts. we will be following especially jcp&l and the connecticut utility given the fact that their storm response after hurricane irene was the really harshly criticized by regulators and they really cannot afford to do it again.
and check in on her neighbors. >> let me take a chance. we left for irene and we felt we didn't really have to go. so that's why we stayed. >> a flashlight. >> i don't have one. >> reporter: but nightfall brought regret. the power is out. the water outside rising. >> it is 6:55 and the power just went out. so we're officially screwed. >> reporter: "20/20" producers are here with mary when they spot flames down the block lighting up the flooded streets. they flee to a rooftop they hope will be safe. >> there's water everywhere, and embers flying. >> it's like the apocalypse. i mean there's like that fire. we've evacuated. this is real. >> reporter: this is a community that has been hit hard before losing 32 people on 9/11. today, residents stoically faced their newest disaster, vowing they will come back again. elizabeth vargas, abc news, breezy point, queens. >> thank you so much, elizabeth, and elizabeth will have more tonight on our special edition of "20/20" the perfect storm at 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight. >>> coming up right here our sam champion here, what he saw in this storm he says
neighborhood david forest remembers how long it took to get electricity restored after hurricane irene. how is it to know you're going into a period of a week or so without power? >> i think it's better than last year, we kept thinking it was going to be everyday we'd get power. >> reporter: just next door, susan crowe says she's prepared for a number of rough days. >> you can have a somehow ere but it's a cold shower. you have no hot water. of course, you have nothing to cook with. >> reporter: down the street, we bumped into utility contractor rusty maxwell who said he was too busy to stop for long. what's involved with getting the power back on here? >> well, the power company has to go evaluation all the feeders and the power sources and go from there. >> reporter: scott, this is what those utility crews are up against: giant trees on top of power lines. these trees have to be removed before power can be restored. >> pelley: we wondered if sandy would disrupt gasoline supplies. it turns out six refineries in the northeast were affected by the storm. two of them shut down and four scaled
afectados por el paso del huracan irene en ese mismo territorio en 2011. muchas casas fueron arrancadas de sus cimientos, carros terminaron volcados y hasta un juego mecanico fue arrastrado por el agua.. mayra tostado. noticiero telemundo 48. cesar ---ambos candidatos a la presidencia han tenido que suspender sus campaÑas proselitistas por sandy... take vo ---pero hoy el presidente barack obama, hablo con su equipo de seguridad nacional y pidio a todas las agencias federales que hagan todo lo posible para ayudar a los damnificados por la tormenta... ---el mandatario anuncio que continuara en la capital de la nacion, para cerciorarse personalment e que todos los recursos federales sean proporcionados a las labores de rescate emprendidas por gobiernos estatales y locales... topvo blanca ---mientras que aqui en la bahia, la empresa energtica pg&e informo que enviara 150 de sus empleados y equipo, a la ciudad de nueva york para ayudar a restaurar el servicio elctrico que fue suspendido tras el paso de "sandy". ---los empleados de la compaÑia en la bahia y el valle central partiran esta noche
the fox business network. there are estimates this could be 20 billion compare that to hurricane irene that was $15 billion. some are saying it could be as big as hurricane katrina. how could that be? >> we are talking the east coast. we are talking about places that aren't necessarily prepared for this stuff. new york city shut down for two-days the stock market shut down for two-days. i think we are going to end up adding in the lost costs -- the subways aren't up for another two-days. that number is large there's no doubt about it. the estimates seem to be picking up. yesterday there was credible sources saying 35-45 billion. >> you look at the infrastructure new york city, the tunnels, boston elsewhere the number really starts going up. >> flooding unique flooding, salt water. this is an uncommon storm unusual cha will be involved as well. >> the economy is certainly growing at not too great rate. an anemic rate. what does it mean for the overall economy. >> it is pretty frightening. you couple this with the notion of fiscal cliffs. the last couple weeks the stock market is getting
heard governor chris christie. back during irene, they had more flooding. the governor will be touring the damage tomorrow along with president obama. right now we're live in abseca, new jersey, craig boswell. >>> member of california's national guard and emergency management agencies are heading to the east coast. the national guard is sending two helicopters and two para helicopter teams. >>> now we showed you yesterday here at five clock how that super storm is affecting bay area air travel. today the situation is easing just a bit. ktvu's paul chambers live at sfo with the one thing there that seems to be saving some passengers from misery. >> reporter: the effects can still be felt in the bay area. however there is hope airport officials say some cities have limited service. >> reporter: if you're headed to or coming from the east coast the signs for your flight replains the same. cancelled. 115 in all here at sfo. >> a large number of cancellations, the difference is today we are beginning to see some limited flights coming from the west coast to primarily boston and washington,
there i think contractors and i use it for my beach house redo after irene, sandy is making me go back to that one. the real story is that rest oration heart wear is growing like a weed. that's why i want to you get a piece of this ipo. back in 2008, the combination of the recession wreaked havoc on it and the company has taken a hit. once it was private the new owners did something they never could have gotten away with. they had restoration doubled down on being an upscale down with big ticket furniture. you need a big house for this. ritzy chandeliers and closing many of it's old stores and replacing them with free standing galleries. fast forward to today. they are putting up pretty good numbers. the company is taking shares with the home furnishing markets. by targeting high income consumers. it is a smaller store base than williamson opena. so the company has a lot of room to expand. in the most recent nine-week period, restoration posted a 27.8% increase in same store sales. for the last 12 months in july they had a 29% increase. people these are bullish numbers. william sonoma,
as to when the lights will come back on. >> during irene it took eight days for full restoration for hurricane sandy it may take longer. >> reporter: the new jersey governor chris christie took a tour of the destruction and consoled home openers that lost everything. >> very difficult day, very difficult day. >> reporter: new jersey is not the only state recovering today. officials are saying the worse is behind them. >> it's the beagaining o a process we all know will take a while but this is the end of the downside and hopefully from here is going up. >> and you heard governor christie he said nothing prepared him for what he saw when he got out to tour the damaged area. he will do the same with president obama. >>> all right, thank you craig. from new jersey we go to our weather center our chief meteorologist. what's the situation now with that massive storm. >> the storm is still massive. the worse is over. that tial surge, the big surf of last night that's when the real problems happen. we're going to see continued sunshine. over the next 24 hours it makes it way into easte
and it is getting colder. it is not like we didn't know the storm was coming. we had learning moments with irene and another winter storm that hit us with a punch and a lot of the simple things they do not communicate properly and we do not have the out of state crews work properly with our local utilities and con-ed still is not delivering dry ice. i have been personally out there delivering the try ice that has been provided and when you get off the back of the truck the ice was gone. people need it. >>neil: but it is more than that. i know in tokyo or places that are ravaged by earthquakes and tsunamis with each one they build a stronger building, but here, they build the same transformer that is no more upgraded to withstand serious weather than the prior one and we are right back in the same pot. >>guest: i share the senate homeland security committee and i will reach out and continue to reach out to the governor and my colleague, outside of new york -- outside of jerusalem, new york city is the number one target for terrorists. the utilities view manpowers and hours as an expense and new y
numbers come in and basically in relation to storms like hugo, katrina, irene, you're like, uh-oh. >> gives you an idea how strong it is. wall of water that came up the new jersey coastline and to new york. big push. happier note, and trick or treaters, happy halloween. >> if you're wearing a costume, do you need a coat over it? >> i don't think, but a couple of layers underneath the costume. not bitter cold here. i can remember halloweens past when i was a kid and one or two where it was cold. >> and the rain. that's the worst. >> yeah. the rain and the 40s. so the good news is, we're just -- chilly. i couldn't get it out. >> a creepy chill. >> i was going to use a creepy voice, but it didn't happen. upper 40s for the kids trick or treating. should be dry. that's the best part of the forecast here, as things are gradually improving. doesn't mean we don't have a few rain showers at the moment. we're not quite down with the rain, particularly north and west, towards hagerstown. persistent batch to the south and west, towards culpeper as well. parts of the area not done with the
con el paso del huracán irene. >>> es por eso que hay que tender una mano para quienes necesitan ayuda, así que, usted puede llamar al número en pantalla de la cruz roja al número en pantalla (información en pantalla) ,más adelante tenemos más de la cobertura especial. >>> es momento de nuestra primera pausa y al regresar unos iracundos campesinos enfrentan con violencia a la policía para desatar su ira. >>> carlos vives volvió a nacer en un video musical en primicia en primer impacto, ya regresamos ♪. >>> la rebeldía de manifestantes desató un violento enfrentamiento, tenemos a verónica del castillo desde la capital mexicana que tiene además las imágenes, buenas tardes para ti. >>> así e,s muy buenas tardes, los enfrentamientos fueron por un conflicto agrario que viene de tiempo atrás, la manifestación fue avivada por los campesinos. >>>e l grupo de iracundos vecinos arremetió contra policías hasta dejarlos bañados en sangre,fue necesaria la presencia del escuadrón de paramédicos y emergencias medicas para cuidar a los heridos. >>> la secretaria de gobernación
anything like it before. irene nothing even close. i went to the beach yesterday and it was like a tornado went through. i've never seen anything like it. i walk it every day. >> i've never seen anything like that. we've been through the storms the the nor easters and been through the blizzards but this one they said it was going to be really bad and it certainly was. >> reporter: bell mar emergency responders have been in the flood waters pulling people from their homes. >> staging ambulances over here and they get in their boats and go out and kayak out and motor out to wherever and pick up whoever needs help. >> reporter: the governor is urging patience -- is going to get the people understand -- >> oh, yeah. yeah. i think this town is resilient. and it's been through some stuff. so we know to sit and you know, follow directions. >> reporter: bruce johnson reporting from new jersey. >> could have been us. and there was a series of natural gas fires on the jersey shore town of brick township this morning. but nobody was hurt they tell us. >>> closer to home dominion virginia power is try
that we took last year with irene. with lee. we had 5 reported deaths so far. we hoping that is where it is. we actual have snowfall in the lower highlands. i imagine there were some ski lomgs thalodgesthat are happy. we have 1.1 customers without electric service in pennsylvania right now. major companies are working hard, they brought in about 2300 service providers, and workers from other states to help resolve problems here in pennsylvania. as i look at what is going on in new york, and new jersey, i am counting that we're lucky compared to them. but, you know with one million people without electricity, a lot of wind damage, it appears, some flooding damage, this has been an impact on pennsylvania. neil: you mentioned 1 million or so without power, we hear 3 million in new jersey, we told most will not have it back any time soon. we're a week away, from an election. where it is conceivable a lot of people will not be able to go to polls, they would have to get a jazz group of voters to do that. do you envision a problem on election day? >> right now, i do not invick problems, i -
. no doubt about it. you look at hurricane irene, tropical storm irene, the cost to state and local governments of new york was $1.2 billion. that was for recovery and cleanup. clearly this is going to be an economic hit on us. dimensions of which we just don't know yet. >> it's interesting how it impacted with mta shut down and people unable to get into manhattan for example. lower manhattan almost deserted. certainly very few businesses operating and few businesses operating at night. how does that work its way through the economy? >> very significantly. we take for granted the extensive public transportation system we have in the new york city metropolitan area. it's the life blood to our economy. when that life blood is not pumping, it will have a serious impact. it's not just how soon will trains be running but will be repair costs? they will be significant. mta had its own financing troubles particularly with regard to that capital program. they obviously weren't anticipating the kind of damage that this storm has brought. a long-term where we're at with financing for the mta
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at bellevue hospital? >> yeah. i think that's the best way of
to the last storm 14 months ago, irene. that was when the subways were shut down. but the difference was the subways ultimately weren't damagedded. so they got pretty much right back into... right back into work. you know, it's interesting. wre not getting the/11 comparisons which is really the last thing that fully affected everybody in the city. but you're not really hearing that. the comparison that came up, for instance, the new york stock ex-closed for weather two days in a row. the last time they did that was the blizzard of 1888. nobody around here members the blizzard of 1888 so there's not a lot of talk about, we look back and remember that big old blizzard. >> woodruff: we understand the stock exchange is open again tomorrow. what about work in general? are people expecting togo back work, to get any semblance of life back to normal? >> tomorrow will be a really interesting day because i think after two days and after the weather kind of gets back to normal, you will get people feeling antsy. you will get them wanting to get out and also too get out and make a living. it's
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
a billion dollars. hurricane irene was over $15 billion. it is not good economically. it is not good environmentally. and it is terrible to say to our children that we don't care about your future. we're just going to continue dumping 90 million tons of global warming pollution every single day into the atmosphere as if it's an open sewer. even though the scientific community tells us it's creating a disaster. >> jennifer: well, i tell you thank you for the wakeup call and for the clarity that is former vice president al gore with a clear message. up next, he quite literally wrote the book on hurricane katrina. he knows a little something about presidential elections as well. it is a good combination for tonight's show. historian douglas brinkley is entering "the war room." he's next. stay right with us. [ male announcer ] pillsbury grands biscuits. delicious. but say i press a few out flat... add some beef sloppy joe sauce... and cheese fold it all up and boom! i just made an unbeatable unsloppy joe pil
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)